<![CDATA[Deanna McGaughey-Summers - Northwood Comp II]]>Fri, 05 Feb 2016 16:49:35 -0800Weebly<![CDATA[Week 7:  Visual Rhetoric]]>Mon, 07 Dec 2015 19:02:20 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-7-visual-rhetoric

Learning Objectives

  • understand how visual rhetoric is used in contemporary workplace an academic writing
  • peer review presentations
  • take quiz 2


Reminders

​Online Activities for Week 8
  • Submit final draft of WA #3
  • Review for final assessment
  • Create final drafts of presentation materials
  • Post questions about the final assessment on week 8 discussion board
Online activities due by 11:59pm on 12/14

Visual Rhetoric and Presentation Review

  1. Review discussion board assignment
  2. Peer Review Presentation Materials:  (1) Does the presentation material represent the entirety of the research project (literature review, primary research, and conclusions)? (2) What are the strengths?  (3) What are the weaknesses?

Grammar Review

Handouts will be distributed (time willing) in class

Quiz #2

We'll take quiz #2 in class.  You may not use any additional materials when taking the quiz.

Final Assessment Study Guide

structure_of_a_research_paper.pdf
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<![CDATA[Week 6:  Data Analysis]]>Mon, 30 Nov 2015 20:06:38 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-6-data-analysis

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how data analysis is used in research
  • Learn how to conduct data analysis

Reminders

Online Activities for Week 6/7:
  • Read articles on visual rhetoric
  • Complete discussion board assignments
  • Create infographic, Sway, or PowerPoint
  • Prepare for quiz #2
Online activities due by 11:59pm on 12/7

Data Analysis

Data Analysis is the process of systematically applying statistical and/or logical techniques to describe and illustrate, condense and recap, and evaluate data.
Whichever industry you work in, or whatever your interests, you will almost certainly have come across a story about how “data” is changing the face of our world. It might be helping to cure a disease, boost a company’s revenue, make a building more efficient or be responsible for those targeted ads you keep seeing.

Structure of a Research Paper

Part I:  Literature Review:  establishes background information on your topic and introduces your thesis.  You've finished this part.  See the handouts from Week 2 (http://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/category/week-2) for information on how to cite and incorporate sources into your papers.

Part II:  Methods:  describes how you conducted research that you can use to support your thesis statement.   You've begun this part.

Part III:  Discussion/Conclusion:  discusses what you found in your research and identifies the significance of your findings. You've begun this part.

Writing the Methods Section

Review your WA #3 to see if it answers these questions:
  • What your specific research question is
  • Who you surveyed and why
  • The general topics you asked about and why

If you didn't answer these questions, you may do so now.  The methods section should be one-two paragraphs and not include any discussion of your findings.

Writing the Discussion and Conclusions

Review, with another student, your WA #3 assignment:
  • What are the most significant findings of your primary research?  
  • How do these findings support or challenge your thesis statement?
  • What are the significance of your findings?  

Each of these bullet points should be between one and three paragraphs.  Make an outline that includes additional information you'll need to include in the final draft of your paper that addresses each of these points.
wa_3_final_draft.pdf
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Online Activities and Homework for Week 7

For your presentation, you will need to create a visual representation of your research.  You may use any one of the following:

Infographics:  Information graphics or infographics are graphic visual representations of information, data or knowledge intended to present information quickly and clearly. They can improve cognition by utilizing graphics to enhance the human visual system's ability to see patterns and trends.
https://infogr.am
http://piktochart.com


Sways:  Interactive reports and presentations.
https://sway.com

PowerPoints: 
a software package designed to create electronic presentations consisting of a series of separate pages or slides.

For your upcoming homework, you need to choose one of these visual forms to present your research.
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<![CDATA[Week 5: Primary Research, Classification, Definition, and Division]]>Tue, 24 Nov 2015 15:55:04 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-5-primary-research-classification-definition-and-division

Learning Objectives

  • understand informative writing, including its characteristic features
  • analyze informative writing
  • understand argumentative writing, including its characteristic features
  • analyze argumentative writing
  • understand how to write effective survey question

Reminders

Online Activities for Week 6:
  • Submit rough draft for WA #3
  • Read tab 5 and tab 7 in Troyka
  • Complete discussion board assignments
Online activities due by 11:59pm on 11/30

WA #3:  Primary Research

wa__survey_research.pdf
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Writing Survey Questions

writing-good-survey-questions-handouts.pdf
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Classification and Definition

Classification is sorting things into groups or categories on a single basis of division. A classification paper says something meaningful about how a whole relates to parts, or parts relate to a whole
A definition essay is writing that explains what a term means. Some terms have definite, concrete meanings, such as glass, book, or tree. Terms such as honesty, honor, or love are abstract and depend more on a person's point of view.
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<![CDATA[Week 4:  Literature Reviews and Thesis Statements]]>Sun, 15 Nov 2015 17:59:49 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-4-literature-reviews-and-thesis-statements

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the revision and proofreading process
  • Peer review literature reviews
  • Understand how to write complicated research questions

Reminders

ONLINE ENGAGEMENT WEEK 4/5
  • Submit final draft of WA #2
  • Read chapter 9 and 10 in Subject and Strategy
  • Complete discussion board activities
Online activities due by 11:59pm on 11/23

Revision and Proofreading

Revision means to look again. After you write your draft, look at it again to improve your ideas, evidence, and organization.  By revising (also known as rewriting or changing) parts of your writing, you can produce a higher quality document. Revision happens more than once in the same draft.  Read your draft a few times to make some changes, and then look at the changed version again to make additional changes.  Repeat this process until you feel confident that your paper has focused ideas, strong evidence, and an effective organization.

Proofreading
involves reading your document to correct the smaller typographical, grammatical, and spelling errors. Proofreading is usually the very last step you take before sending off the final draft of your work for evaluation or publication.  It comes after you have addressed larger matters such as style, content, citations, and organization during revising. Like revising, proofreading demands a close and careful reading of the text. Although quite tedious, it is a necessary and worthwhile exercise that ensures that your reader is not distracted by careless mistakes. 

general_peer_review_questions.doc
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Writing Thesis Statements

thesis_statements.docx
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<![CDATA[Week 3:  Writing Literature Reviews and Paragraphing]]>Sun, 08 Nov 2015 18:41:19 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-3-writing-literature-reviews-and-paragraphing

Learning Objectives

  • Take APA quiz
  • Review annotated bibliographies
  • Understand purpose of literature reviews
  • Understand how to use bibliographies and synthesis matrices to write literature reviews
  • Understand paragraphing and the M.E.A.L plan

Reminders

  • Read chapters 14 and 15 in Subject and Strategy
  • Read tab 4 in Troyka
  • Complete discussion board activities for weekly reading
  • Submit rough draft for WA #2
Online activities due by 11:59pm on 11/16

Peer Review Annotated Bibliographies

peer_review_for_annotated_bibliographies.docx
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What are Literature Reviews?

A literature review discusses published information in a particular subject area, and sometimes information in a particular subject area within a certain time period.

A literature review can be just a simple summary of the sources, but it usually has an organizational pattern and combines both summary and synthesis. A summary is a recap of the important information of the source, but a synthesis is a re-organization, or a reshuffling, of that information. It might give a new interpretation of old material or combine new with old interpretations. Or it might trace the intellectual progression of the field, including major debates. And depending on the situation, the literature review may evaluate the sources and advise the reader on the most pertinent or relevant.


But how is a literature review different from an academic research paper?
The main focus of an academic research paper is to develop a new argument, and a research paper will contain a literature review as one of its parts. In a research paper, you use the literature as a foundation and as support for a new insight that you contribute. The focus of a literature review, however, is to summarize and synthesize the arguments and ideas of others without adding new contributions.

Why do we write literature reviews?
Literature reviews provide you with a handy guide to a particular topic. If you have limited time to conduct research, literature reviews can give you an overview or act as a stepping stone. For professionals, they are useful reports that keep them up to date with what is current in the field. For scholars, the depth and breadth of the literature review emphasizes the credibility of the writer in his or her field. Literature reviews also provide a solid background for a research paper’s investigation. Comprehensive knowledge of the literature of the field is essential to most research papers.
example_literature_review_students.pdf
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Paragraphing

paragraphing.docx
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WA #2:  Literature Review

wa_2_literature_review_comp_ii.docx
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<![CDATA[Week 2:   Rhetoric and Rhetorical Awareness]]>Tue, 03 Nov 2015 20:49:48 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-2-rhetoric-and-rhetorical-awareness

Learning Objectives

  • Define rhetoric
  • Compare and contrast the traditional and contemporary rhetorical canon
  • Define and apply the components of rhetorical situations
  • Understand and apply the concepts of ethos, pathos, and logos

Reminders

​Online Activities:
  • Read chapter 12 in Subject and Strategy
  • Complete discussion board assignments
  • Submit rough draft of WA #1
  • Prepare for quiz #1 (APA style and formatting)
Online activities due by 11:59pm on 11/9

The Art of Rhetoric

Understanding APA

apa_made_easy.pdf
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apa_key_elements.pdf
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Working with Sources

hndts_academic_conversation_templates_worksheet_students.pdf
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quotations-the-writing-center.pdf
File Size: 150 kb
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example_synthesis_matrix.docx
File Size: 16 kb
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annotated_bib_and_essay_wa_northwood.doc
File Size: 40 kb
File Type: doc
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<![CDATA[Week 1:  Introduction to Academic Research]]>Mon, 26 Oct 2015 19:32:03 GMThttp://www.dlmsummers.info/northwood-comp-ii/week-1-introduction-to-academic-research

Learning Objectives

  • Reflect on the history of writing and research
  • Describe how new technologies affect contemporary writing practices
  • Understand the conventions of academic writing

Reminders

Online Engagement Weeks 1/2:
  • Read handouts on research regarding technologies and learning (available in this folder)
  • Complete discussion board activities on rhetoric  Due:  11/2 by 11:59pm

Academic Writing Process

Understanding the Conventions of Academic Writing

Introduction
Try this exercise.

Academic writing in English is linear, which means it has one central point or theme with every part contributing to the main line of argument, without digressions or repetitions. Its objective is to inform rather than entertain. As well as this it is in the standard written form of the language.There are eight main features of academic writing that are often discussed. Academic writing is to some extent: complex, formal, objective, explicit, hedged, and responsible. It uses language precisely and accurately.

Complexity
Written language is relatively more complex than spoken language. Written language has longer words, it is lexically more dense and it has a more varied vocabulary. It uses more noun-based phrases than verb-based phrases. Written texts are shorter and the language has more grammatical complexity, including more subordinate clauses and more passives.

Complexity

Formality
Academic writing is relatively formal. In general this means that in an essay you should avoid colloquial words and expressions.

Formality

Precision
In academic writing, facts and figures are given precisely.

Precision

Objectivity
Written language is in general objective rather than personal. It therefore has fewer words that refer to the writer or the reader. This means that the main emphasis should be on the information that you want to give and the arguments you want to make, rather than you. For that reason,  academic writing tends to use nouns (and adjectives), rather than verbs (and adverbs).

Objectivity

Explicitness
Academic writing is explicit about the relationships int he text. Furthermore, it is the responsibility of the writer in English to make it clear to the reader how the various parts of the text are related. These connections can be made explicit by the use of different signalling words.

Explicitness

Accuracy
Academic writing uses vocabulary accurately. Most subjects have words with narrow specific meanings. Linguistics distinguishes clearly between "phonetics" and "phonemics"; general English does not.

Accuracy

Hedging
In any kind of academic writing you do, it is necessary to make decisions about your stance on a particular subject, or the strength of the claims you are making. Different subjects prefer to do this in different ways.

A technique common in certain kinds of academic writing is known by linguists as a ‘hedge’.

Hedging

Responsibility
In academic writing you must be responsible for, and must be able to provide evidence and justification for, any claims you make. You are also responsible for demonstrating an understanding of any source texts you use.

Responsibility

The Peer Review Process

Conducting Secondary Research

Activity:  Choosing a Research Topic

Choose a research topic you would like to focus on this term.  
accessing_articles_from_the_databases.pdf
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